How to be non-binary in Switzerland

A portrait picture of Loren Schaad.
Loren Schaad.

We want to explore how non-binary people living in Switzerland experience struggles and support in their daily life. Within focus groups participants can exchange their experiences, knowledge and needs with each other. All groups will be moderated by a non-binary facilitator. From the groups’ conclusions we want to derive suggestions to improve the inclusion of non-binary people in society, politics, and health care in Switzerland.

Loren Schaad in collaboration with Nicu Tschurr supervised by Tabea Hässler (University of Zurich) and Léïla Eisner (University of Lausanne)

Identity denial and well-being among bi- and pansexual individuals

In the previous survey of the Swiss LGBTIQ+ Panel, bisexual and pansexual individuals attracted attention as they reported significantly higher negative well-being than homosexual participants. Additionally, they reported facing unique challenges due to their sexual orientation. However, little research has exclusively investigated why this minority group is at such a high risk for mental health problems or what factors account for the differences in discrimination experiences between homo- and plurisexual individuals.

A portrait picture of Cynthia Thöni.
Cynthia Thöni.

Based on previous research, denial and erasure of their sexual orientation and identities are assumed to be major stressors of their daily lives (Maimon et al., 2019). The present study explores how identity denial processes coming from LGBTIQ+ and cis-heterosexual people are associated with the well-being of Swiss bi-, pan-, and other plurisexual individuals.

Cynthia Thöni supervised by Tabea Hässler (University of Zurich) and Léïla Eisner (University of Lausanne)

How discrimination affects the well-being of sexual minority members

A portrait picture of Patrizia Eicher.
Patrizia Eicher.

The aim was to better understand the mechanisms whereby discrimination affects the well-being of sexual minority members. On the one hand, differences in experiences of discrimination and well-being across different subgroups were examined, on the other hand, a comprehensive overall model was examined, which took into account the factors internalized LGBTIQ+ negativity, connectedness to the LGBTIQ+ scene, social support and pride.

Patrizia Eicher supervised by Tabea Hässler (University of Zurich) and Léïla Eisner (University of Lausanne)